Textual Analysis : Camerawork

Camera Shots

  • Wide shot/mid shot/medium shot: from waist to the top of the head (the most common shot used in the filming process).IMG_5385.JPG
  • Long shot: full body shot, this shows more of the environment.IMG_5386.JPG
  • Extreme long shot: a shot of the character in the environment.
  • Close up: a head shot.IMG_5387.JPG
  • Extreme close up: specific parts, for example: a shot of the eyes, mouth, nose etc etc.IMG_5388.JPG

Framing

  • The rule of thirds: this is a rule which is used by many directors and film makers. Things in the shot, which have the rule of thirds applied to them always look better. The rule can be used on a camera with the rule of thirds grid on the settings of the camera.

Composition

  • One shot: a shot with one person in it.
  • Two shot: a shot with two people in.
  • Point of view shot: the shot used to show the point of view of someone or something.

Focus

  • Shallow focus: a specific focus of something (a pen is focussed but everything else in the background).
  • Deep focus: everything is in focus in the shot.
  • Focus pull: within one shot, the focus changes from an object in the foreground to an object in the background and, vice versa.

Camera Angles

  • Eye level shot: a shot from middle point/eye level.
  • High angle shot: the camera is high (almost like it is above the subject).
  • Low angle shot: the camera is low (almost like it is looking up at the subject).
  • Bird’s eye view: looking straight below/what a bird would see in the sky.
  • Down shot: more limited than a bird’s eye view shot. A down shot would be done in a room whereas, a bird’s eye view shot would be done outside.
  • Up shot: opposite a bird’s eye view shot, on the floor/below something.
  • A dutch tilt: usually used to show drunkenness/disorientation.

Camera Movements

Aerial Shots

  • Helicopter shot: a shot done from a helicopter.
  • Shots using drones: a shot using a drone. It is like a helicopter shot but, cheaper and more stable.
  • Wire shot: this shot is done by using a wire which, the camera is attached to. For example, they used a wire to show a 100m sprint at the olympics.
  • Crane shot: a pivot with a long stick attached to it which, the camera is placed on. It can also be used to show shots on the floor as well as shots in the air/above.

Dolly Shots

  • Dolly shot: a wheeled vehicle on a track which means a smooth and precise movement (dolly out = further away, dolly in = moving forward/closer up).
  • Crab shot: uses a dolly track but, for sideways movement (called a crab shot because, it resembles the movement of a crab).
  • Arc shot: this shot is done by using a dolly track but, instead of sideways and forwards/backwards, it moves the camera in the shape of an arc.
  • Fixed shot: pan is a horizontal shot on a tripod and a tilt is camera moving vertically (tilting up and down) on a tripod.
  • Handheld shot: the cameraman is actually holding the camera.
  • Steadicam: the camera is strapped onto someone’s shoulder with a harness. This allows the camera to get a smooth shot from a handheld perspective.
  • Over the shoulder shot: used in conversation.

Zoom

  • Zooming in/out: using the lens to zoom in and out of a subject (zooming out of something is also known as a reverse zoom).
  • Crash zoom/dolly zoom: dollying into something but, at the same time, zooming out (and vice versa).

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